Real Faith

salt and lightFrank Bruni recently wrote in The New York Times: “Faith and government shouldn’t be as cozy as they are in this country. Faith is a serious matter, and an important one, but it’s trivialized when it’s toted too readily and stridently into the political arena. Politicians’ religions should be a source of their strength and of their empathy, not of their agendas.”

I strongly disagree. Faith is trivialized when you keep it in a compartment, separate from the rest of your life.

A careful study of history will reveal that the founding fathers of our nation viewed their faith in God as the foundation of their agenda, not something set apart from it.

Scripture shows that the first Christians were driven by their desire to obey Jesus and spread their faith throughout their culture. The Sermon on the Mount reminds followers of Christ that we are the salt of the earth and the light of the world. That means that we are to impact our world for Jesus Christ.

It’s a shame when people wrongly believe that faith is a private matter. True faith is meant to be shared.  I pity those whose faith is nothing more than a fairy tale—something they believe in themselves, but has no relevance for anyone else.

“You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled by men.”—Matthew 5:13.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Christian Living, Culture, Leadership and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Real Faith

  1. Wally Fry says:

    And if you feel you need to separate them…stay out of politics. Too many take office and compromise.

  2. John ocull says:

    I admire the Dwight Eisenhower presidency. I understand he is the only president to pray during an inauguration speech. I yearn for a leader, with the faith and courage, to publicly align himself with God as a disciple of Jesus Christ.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s